How to Make a Candle Stick Holder Bud Vase
DIY
April 28, 2022

How to Make a Candle Stick Holder Bud Vase

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I love having home décor pieces that have multiple uses—you get more bang for your buck that way! Candle stick holders are always a cozy home accessory to have around, but what if you could also use them as a bud vase? I’m sharing this quick and easy project with you in case you want to try!

I don’t decorate with, or burn taper candles very often, although I do love the way they look. I still have candle stick holders, though, and seem to be drawn to them at the thrift store. There are so many types out there too, so they can work with so many different types of decorating styles. It’s fun to find items like this that can span the many decorating aesthetics and work in various ways.

I wanted something fun and different for my Easter tablescape this year and decided to get creative with my brass candle stick holders. I’ve used them before to hold different things like small decorative objects or vintage Christmas ornaments, but that’s about it. I started thinking about some test tubes I bought several years ago to propagate plant cuttings in and how they would be just about the perfect size to put in the candle holder itself.

After grabbing the test tubes from my décor stash (a subject for another day…it’s such a mess!), I realized they were a little big for the candle stick holders that I wanted to use. Also, I only had five of them and needed more than that.

There is an antique mall about an hour away from us that has a whole booth dedicated to all things scientific paraphernalia…think test tubes, diagrams, boilers, etc. I love visiting it because the items are so different…and I’m strangely attracted to that sort of aesthetic. I was meeting a friend to thrift near the store, so I made the extra drive to see what they had. At first, I couldn’t find the booth, but knew that we had just seen it at Christmas time—surely it still had to be there. I made another pass and found it—whew!

Of course, I had forgotten to bring one of the candle stick holders to test the tubes in, so I just had to eyeball it. Just a note: none will be a perfect fit…so I’ll show you what to use to stabilize them, later in the post.

I got home and couldn’t wait to try the test tubes out! Like I said, they won’t necessarily fit perfectly and/or be stable without using something additional. Don’t worry…I have you covered!

Now, this could possibly be the quickest DIY post ever because this is the easiest project to do!! You just need the right supplies.

Test Tubes: I’ve used these and these. Candle holders do have different sized openings, so you may need to buy a couple options, depending on what yours are like.

Sta-Put Candle Grips: I love these and think they’d be so helpful to use with candles as well.

Stick-Um Candle Adhesive: I used this the first time I tried making the bud vases. I’ve used it in the past with candles and it works like a charm.

Duck Brand Electrical Tape: This is nice to use to bulk up the test tube a bit at the bottom, to help it fit better in the candle holder.

Just an FYI, not all openings on candle stick holders are created equally. That’s why you’ll occasionally have to cram your candle in or use something to hold others up. Equally, there is some trial and error involved in the test tube sizes as well. These are the test tubes I ordered and have used. I know that they work in most of the candle stick holders I have—when I use something to stabilize them.

However, they were too small for the Vaseline glass candle holders I just thrifted, so I used my original test tubes, plus something to help them stand up straight. I tried to find something that seemed to be the same size as the bigger test tubes I had—you can find them here. Also, I think this size should work for in most candle holders.

All you need to do is overlap a couple of these Sta-Put Candle Grips (about half-way over each other), put the test tube on top, and push them down into the candle holder. Again, you may need to make some adjustments, but this should work just fine! When I originally did the prototypes, I wrapped electrical tape around the base and added Stick-Um Candle Adhesive to around the base as well—that seemed to keep them in place well. The stabilizer rounds are my favorite, though.

That’s really it! No magic here, although, it seems like it! You will find that you may need a couple sizes of test tubes and will probably want to have the different stabilizer products on hand—I liked having a mix of things to use.

Such a fun and unique project, though! I have used both real and dried florals in the test tube bud vases. They are neat because you can use real stems with water—I think that looks so good. If you don’t want to mess with that, though, faux or dried stems are just fine too.

I think it would be a lot of fun to have a big centerpiece made of these candle stick holder bud vases. Could be such a great idea for a wedding, brunch, or for a dinner you’re hosting. When I shared this project on Instagram, it definitely got some attention. People love things that are out of the ordinary! Also, it’s always nice to find a new way to use an everyday item!


If you’re looking for more DIY and home decor inspiration, I’ve joined several other talented ladies this month on Instagram who are sharing their own projects as well!

collage image labeled #upcyclesquad with images of different spring themed DIY Projects

How to Make a Candle Stick Holder Bud Vase from hprallandco.com | Hilary Prall Blog | Des Moines, IA

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Southern Crush At Home

Is your old couch starting to show its age? Maybe the fabric is worn or stained, or maybe you just want a change of pace. Reupholstering a couch can be a great way to give it new life. I’m sharing with you how to reupholster a couch without removing the old fabric using a Pottery Barn throw blanket.


April Guest Host:

DIY BEAUTY ON PURPOSE

Have an old, dated furniture piece that needs updating? Here's an exciting makeover of a 90's bench turned into a fresh, farmhouse piece.


I hope you feel inspired by this project! Even if you don’t decide to make the candle stick holder bud vases, I hope that I’ve helped you to feel creative in finding a different way to use the decor in your home. I would love to see what you come up with. Share a picture in your Instagram story and tag me—you can find me on Instagram at @hilaryprall.

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